24 March 2010

Dual Glide, Boots and Cycling Legends

Dual Gliding Past the Scuba Shop
Strangely, the scuba-clad mannequin outside the dive shop doesn't attract the attention of these two Copenhageners. Go figure.

Bike Boots
Boots. While we patiently await the emergence of this year's high heel shoes on Copenhagen's cycling heroines.

And remember kids:
Our Cycling Legends
Our cycling legends dress differently than yours. :-) Available as a framed print in our online shop.

16 comments:

Anonymous said...

differently from

Mikael said...

tomayto, tomahto

Anonymous said...

Som engelskstuderende må jeg nok lige byde og sige at det ikke er en smagssag om man siger than eller from. Differently from er et grammatisk korrekt udtryk, det er differently than ikke: det er i stedet en meget dansk fejl, fordi vi går ud fra at man kan oversætte alt direkte.

Sara fra København

@SaraElise på Twitter

A Good Moroccan said...

I would never have associated high heels with cycling !

Kelly D. Talcott said...

Loving that poster! I think I have the same pair somewhere in my closet . . .

Kiwehtin said...

It *is* a nice poster. (Is that a kickstand But I have to vote with Anon-06:54 and engelskstuderende and say this is neither tomayto nor tomahto: it's a resounding tomaRRRRRRto. There's an -er in different(ly) that automatically presses the X:Xer:Xest button in many people's heads, but it's just a part of the root and it ain't a comparison. You sure can't say "Our cycling legends dressing style differs than your cycling legends' style" — for exactly the same reason —, and these two reasons together are why "different(ly) than" sends waves of pain coursing through the brain cells of people who read and write for the meaning of the words ahead of the sound.

So there. Put out your fingers for a rap of the ruler.

As for the scuba-mannequin, I think the two cyclists know it's plastic and doesn't feel the cold. Now, had the shop people perched it atop the hydrant, *that* would have turned heads!

Kiwehtin said...

(I didn't finish changing my other comment before I posted. Aaargghhh...)

Is that a kickstand sticking out of the heel of the shoe on the right?

gih said...

wow! high heels and cycle don't mix. :-)

kfg said...

As others before me have noted, they mix a damned sight better with cycling then they do with walking.

One could even note that they tend to promote a "proper" ball of the foot on the pedals approach, see the first photo of a woman wearing boots with low heels and compare that to the second featuring boots with high heels.

Criteriamour said...

This site is smashing all of my preconceptions about cycling. I would've thought it dangerous to ride in heels.

Lauren said...

Can only agree with others - I have nothing against cycling in high heels, but a great deal against trying to walk more than a few steps in them! Any shoe I can only wear sitting down (whether on a bike or elsewhere) is useless in my daily life.

Sorry - am happy to cycle in my regular clothes, but they have to be at least a bit practical. (Do half the women in Copenhagen work in places where mini-skirts are both suitable and acceptable? )

(Alas?) I don't exist just to be decorative.

Anonymous said...

I like stylish people boys and girls. I was inspired by this web site to even get a old type of cap for the winter and with my old style bike I have being utterly convinced that the only way to travel in a city easily and with pleasure, is to use the "bolt upright" type of bike.
They are a culmination of ergonomic genius and damn stylish too.
ps I just wanted to say that poster is cool

Dolf said...

It is all very much a semantic discussion this one on how cycling legends dress, but my 2 cents say that there is no real problem with the sentence. I would say that it is quite common and acceptable English usage because what Mikael is trying to say is:
Our cycling legends dress differently than your (cycling legends dress), or than “yours do” - which is pretty much the same thing. The end of the sentence is “understood”.
I must however say that I am surprised that an English student makes her corrections in Danish on what is an English language blog

kristi @ lovelyvelo said...

LOVE THIS!

Bob said...

You can argue the grammar. I want to tension the chain for the biker in blue.

Suz said...

Sure the grammatical thing is fine when it slips out in speech or in a blog but if you're printing and framing posters it's a bit like a resume with a speling eror